Vesalius’s De humani corporis Fabrica

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Publisher’s Prospectus & Order Form, Icones Anatomicae
Publisher’s Prospectus & Order Form, Icones Anatomicae
Andreas Vesalius’s De humani corporis Fabrica of 1543 is probably the most beautiful anatomical atlas produced in the 16th century, and Vesalius spared no expense in hiring extraordinary craftsmen to create the woodblocks. In 1932, Samuel Lambert began raising money for the publication of the Icones Anatomicae, an edition of all of the images from the two editions of the Fabrica (1543 and 1555) and some of Vesalius’s other publications. A search at the University of Munich turned up a box containing 227 of the blocks used in the production of the Fabrica and its companion publication from 1543, the Epitome. The University of Munich agreed to co-publish the volume with Academy. No expense was
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Andreas Vesalius’s De humani corporis Fabrica of 1543 is probably the most beautiful anatomical atlas produced in the 16th century, and Vesalius spared no expense in hiring extraordinary craftsmen to create the woodblocks. In 1932, Samuel Lambert began raising money for the publication of the Icones Anatomicae, an edition of all of the images from the two editions of the Fabrica (1543 and 1555) and some of Vesalius’s other publications. A search at the University of Munich turned up a box containing 227 of the blocks used in the production of the Fabrica and its companion publication from 1543, the Epitome. The University of Munich agreed to co-publish the volume with Academy. No expense was spared in the creation of the book; fine handmade paper with a special watermark was created especially for the volume, and photographic reproductions of the missing blocks were made and subtly marked in the descriptive tables. Four hundred copies were printed and sent to Academy. The title pages of both the 1543 and the 1555 editions of the Fabrica are included in the Tabulae, along with a number of the skeletons, muscle men and flayed men that are some of the Fabrica’s most iconic images...READ MORE
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Tabulae Selectae
Tabulae Selectae
The Tabula Selectae, a portfolio of 40 loose plates, illustrates the human skeleton and muscular system through Andreas Vesalius’s iconic skeletons, muscle men, and flayed men. The plates are from Vesalius’s anatomical atlas, De humani corporis Fabrica, which was originally published in 1543. The illustrations come from 227 original wood blocks that were re-discovered at the University of Munich’s library in 1932. However, during a bombing in 1944, these wood blocks were destroyed, making this item very rare. They are all approximately 56.6 centimeters high by 41.9 centimeters wide...READ MORE
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